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Faculty Profile – Kathy Broomall

Kathy Broomall is the Chair of Physical, Life, and Social Sciences at Chatfield College, where she is responsible for all science courses and programs at both the St. Martin and Over-the-Rhine campuses.

Kathy earned her bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Northern Kentucky University and then earned her PhD in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine. While teaching at another school, Kathy had students in her class who had previously attended Chatfield. She observed that they were some of the best students in her class, so she became interested in Chatfield. Growing up in a Catholic school setting, she was familiar with Catholic traditions and became eager to learn more about Chatfield and its mission. Since joining the faculty, Kathy has found Chatfield to be a warm and inviting place and she has enjoyed every minute of working with fellow faculty and staff. She finds Chatfield students very receptive and willing to learn, and that makes her teaching very enjoyable.

Kathy explains, “I was educated by the Catholic school system, and I credit this for my academic success! I started my college teaching career more than 10 years ago, at Miami University, where I was mentored by senior professors in best teaching practices at the college level. I love helping students find their academic strength, and I love helping students discover what they are passionate about!”

Kathy enjoys time teaching and educating students on anatomy, biology, chemistry, and other allied health subjects. In addition to her time working directly with students, she loves talking about school and science outside of the classroom and is always looking for opportunities to discuss academia and what new and exciting things are happening at school. She has spent many years teaching science at other colleges including Miami University, UC Clermont, Xavier University, and Sinclair Community College.

During her time at Chatfield, Kathy has become not just an educator to her students, but a friend as well. She holds a special bond with 2018 graduate Sr. Marcelina Watua, from Tanzania. “I adored having Sr. Marcelina in my A & P courses as well as her independent study for the NCLEX Nursing exam that she was studying for last summer. If Sr. Marcelina needs help, I am there for her! She is actually more of a true ‘sister’ to me. I miss her tremendously,” Kathy said. Sr. Marcelina hopes to return to her home village in Tanzania as a nurse who can offer better health care to rural mothers and babies who have poor access to healthcare and clinics.

When asked about Chatfield, the word she used to best describe the overall environment and experience was ‘awesome’. Kathy really enjoys talking about Chatfield to others and learning more about other experiences from faculty and staff. She truly enjoys working with students in order to help them find what they are passionate about, and is excited to see how she can lead more students toward success.

When not cheerleading for Chatfield, Kathy enjoys time with her husband, Avi Milgram, and with her rescue animals including her two dogs, four cats, and two horses.

Gracie Roades to Attend University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Program

Once Chatfield’s tagline, “Big Dreams Come True Here”, this mantra still rings true. Especially for Gracie Roades, a student of the St. Martin campus who will be attending the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, often known as DAAP, this upcoming fall. The DAAP program is ranked among the best of its kind, not just nationally, but worldwide. Other accolades recently earned by DAAP include BusinessWeek’s Top 30 Design Schools, and International Design Magazine’s globe’s Top 10. U.S. News & World Report ranks UC’s graduate program in design as the sixth best in the nation.

“I honestly cannot wait to start at UC. It is a dream come true for me,” says Gracie. She will be among the few Chatfield students ever to be accepted into DAAP’s very competitive program.

Gracie has always loved art and architecture and credits her father’s real estate flipping business as her inspiration. She plans to become an architectural designer or art curator for museums.  When looking for schools that offer programs in those fields, Gracie knew UC and DAAP would be at the top of her list.

“I visited the DAAP program in the fall and it was the one. The school was phenomenal, and the co-op program is perfect for how I envisioned starting out my career,” she said.

Ranked among the Top 10 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, UC’s co-op program allows students to alternate classroom time with paid, professional work so students can work around the globe to expand their educational options while building impressive resumes and professional networks.

Gracie will be graduating from both North Adams High School and Chatfield College in just a few short weeks as a result of her participation in Ohio’s College Credit Plus program (CCP).  The CCP program is funded by the State of Ohio and allows high school students to take college courses at no cost to them or their families. Credits earned are easily transferable to the next college of their choosing. During a CCP meeting at her high school, Chatfield’s presentation impressed Gracie and she decided to visit campus. There, she fell in love with the rural and bucolic setting from the minute she drove down driveway lined with ornamental pear trees, and the historic and beautiful Sacred Heart Chapel.

“The landscape of the college is stunning!  It was so peaceful and calm—a perfect fit for what I wanted during my CCP years,” Gracie remembers.

Gracie also really likes the small community feel of her classes, and the opportunity to really get to know her instructors and classmates. She appreciates the small classes because of the one-on-one attention she received, making her feel she was able to learn more as a result. Outside of the classroom, Gracie was able to get involved in some of the clubs on campus. She is a member of the national Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society for students of two-year schools, Chatfield’s own Julia Chatfield Honor Society, and the Student Service Club.

“I have been able to expand on my leadership skills while taking advantage of lots of community service opportunities and projects, like the Fall Festival and our current tennis court renovation project. I wouldn’t trade the years I spent here for anything!” she said.

Gracie is very thankful she chose to attend Chatfield as a high school student before enrolling at a large, four-year institution like UC.  In summary, she says, “These years here at Chatfield have greatly affected my education for the better. I feel I am more prepared to move on to the next steps of life because of this college – not only academically, but as a person too. I have made so many great friends I never would have met had it not been for Chatfield.”

Student Profile- Hunter Ellis

Every college campus has them—the student who goes above and beyond, is always busy with some activity or club, and helps rally the other students behind a cause. Hunter Ellis is that student at Chatfield College’s St. Martin campus.

Coming to Chatfield as a College Credit Plus (CCP) student as just a sophomore in high school, Hunter was ready to begin college. He was motivated to take advantage of the CCP program as a freshman because it offers free college credit to high school students, but his mother, a 1999 graduate of Chatfield, thought he should wait another year. Even though Hunter was ready for the challenge of attending college while in high school, he didn’t want to go somewhere big and overwhelming. He found Chatfield to be the perfect fit for him.

“I love the Ursuline legacy at Chatfield, and all the rich history in this beautiful campus. It’s hard not to feel at home when you are here, and family-like atmosphere makes you feel very supported,” Hunter shared.

Once enrolled, Hunter wasted no time in getting involved. As he excelled in academics, he also had a desire to get involved and make connections on campus. Through his couple of years here, the list of clubs in which he was a member continued to grow. Hunter is a member of the national Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, the Chatfield Historical Society, the Chess Club, the Drama Club, a co-founder of Chatfield Youth Ministries, and the president of Chatfield Student Leadership Club.

Although he is active in all the above-mentioned groups, Hunter has made impressive achievements in Student Leadership. Although this group existed in the past, the goals and mission have been re-envisioned with Hunter’s help. Following his initiative, the group has begun visiting the Ohio Veteran’s Home in Georgetown on a monthly basis, has successfully planned and hosted a Fall festival two years in a row, and continues to offer lunches to students and on-campus activities like this month’s Table Tennis Tournament. One major project with Hunter’s name on it is the revitalization of the tennis court on campus. Many of the proceeds the group has raised are to be dedicated to this effort, along with some grant writing and fundraising by the students themselves.

Hunter said, “I think it’s important we show pride in our campus, and I’m excited to leave something for future students to enjoy after we are gone. The extracurricular activities I have participated in are a big part of my Chatfield experience and help me contribute to something bigger than myself.”

Hunter will graduate from both high school and Chatfield this spring. He plans to continue his education at Xavier University with a focus in politics. He wants to go to law school and one day run for public office, maybe even Senator he says. In the meantime, Hunter would also like to volunteer with local ministries and youth sports leagues.

“The people I have meant during my time at Chatfield, both my instructors and friends, have helped me grow as a person,” Hunter said.

What is Lent and are you ready for it?

By: Allison Carrelli – Fitzpatrick

Hello fellow students and staff! Lent is right around the corner, for those of you who did not know, and for those of you who did, are you ready? If you are like me, this may be the first time you are taking Lent seriously, in the perspective of a young unofficial or official Catholic. I have never been baptized in the Catholic Church, but over the past year or so, I have become more familiar and am growing in my basic knowledge of the Catholic faith.

During my childhood, I never really lived in a religious household, and it was not until I was about thirteen or fourteen, when I truly understood what religion was or who God even was. Up until this point, I always remember Lent as being a random time of the year where on Fridays my mother would try to feed me salmon patties or fried fish—most often against my will. She would often find it a losing battle and settle for accepting a single bite as an accomplishment. As for the Easter holiday itself, most of my childhood memories consisted of large Easter baskets filled with candies and toys galore! Fast forward to now, I have developed an eagerness for this upcoming Lent season from listening to great podcasts and videos about this topic! With my excitement for Lent this year, I want to share what the basics of Lent are and some great resources if you want to learn more!
For those who are new to the topic of Lent and how it is celebrated, Lent is a period over forty days that Catholics fast, obey abstinence, and give alms. The reason behind the forty days is that back hundreds of years ago, the Israelites were wandering in the wilderness for forty years because of their disobedience and unbelief in God. Jesus also spent forty days in the wilderness being tempted by the devil. This time frame of forty days lasts from Ash Wednesday, starting on March 6th until Easter on April 21st. It is during this period that specific days are also celebrated before and within the season of Lent. These days include Mardi Gras (or Fat Tuesday), Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, Palm Sunday, and Easter.

Many people don’t relate the two, but Mardi Gras was actually incorporated by Catholics in Rome when Christianity had first arrived there. Mardi Gras, also known as Fat Tuesday in French, was a day to feast and celebrate before everyone was to start their fasting. Those who had foods that were rich and not to be eaten during Lent enjoyed them for the last time until after Easter.
Throughout Lent, Catholics are to fast. It may seem like Catholics are to maybe walk around fast or do everything in lighting quick motions. Although that is quite humorous, that is not what fasting is. Fasting is when you only have one large meal, such as a normal dinner or lunch, and two smaller meals that are no bigger than the one meal put together. An example of this is having a slice or two of toast in the morning, a normal proportioned lunch and a small side dish for dinner. When fasting, you are to also practice abstinence by abstaining from any and all meats on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday and all following Fridays up until Easter. The only exception to the “no meat rule” is fish. That is why you may often see signs around your local town or on the news about fish frys! Along with fasting and abstaining from meats, Catholics also give alms throughout Lent. To give alms means that you donate through an organization or the Church to give to those who are less fortunate. Catholics do this because it reminds them to be humble for the blessings that they have, and it is pleasing to God to give to those who cannot give to themselves.

With all these rules when participating in Lent you may be wondering, why? Why do Catholics obey so many rules for these forty days, and what is the point? I have come to learn that the point in all these rules and the forty-day-long celebration is because of the death and resurrection of Christ. We are to use this time to make ourselves better people from abstaining from certain things to become more humble in the presence of God. Throughout our lives we have been so blessed through Christ’s sacrifice that we have come to mistake the difference between needs and wants. Through abstinence and fasting, we are to become closer to God in understanding that He is the purpose for our lives, and we should hold him close in times of hardship and in times of celebration.

As I’m learning more and more about the Catholic faith, I have found some great resources that I would love to share with all of you! Throughout my search for information, I have found many great resources through our own Chatfield library, YouTube, and even podcasts! For my learning style, I love to listen and see the topics that are being explained to me. The podcast “Pints with Aquinas” by Matt Fradd and the YouTube channel “Ascension Presents” are my go-tos when I have a question or want to learn more about a certain topic. Here is a list of resources if you want to learn more about the Catholic faith!

If you would like to give alms this Lent, I would suggest going to your local Catholic Church or Hope Emergency located on Kernan Road in Lynchburg, Ohio.

Youtube:
Picking a Thing For Lent by Ascension Presents
What’s the Point of Fasting During Lent? by Ascension Presents

Podcasts:
10 Things to Give up or Take on this Lent by Pints with Aquinas
Are Sundays Part of Lent? By Pints with Aquinas

Books:
Rediscover Lent by Matthew Kelly
Give Up Worry for Lent!: 40 Days to Finding Peace in Christ by Gary Zimak

Libby (e-books):
Signs of Life by Scott Hahn
The Story of Jesus by David Angus

Reads for Black History Month

Black History Month is upon us and with it, the opportunity to pick up a great book by an African American author. The Chatfield College library has many books on African American history, and many by black authors – however a plethora of awesome titles are available to you through the SEO consortium and the Ohio Digital Library. From the recently released The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls by Anissa Gray to classics like Beloved by Toni Morrison and popular nonfiction books like Hidden Figures, the consortium has got you covered! You can order books online through our website with your student ID, or you can call, email, or stop by the circulation desk for assistance.

At the end of this post I will link several good articles with reading recommendations, but first here’s what’s on my to read list:

 

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

This is a rom-com inspired novel featuring the ever popular “fake dating” turned real. Recommended to me by a coworker, she described it as a fun and quick read. And this is coming from a lady with a reading list a mile long and a tendency to drop a book the moment it loses her interest. This multicultural romance is the perfect pick for Valentine’s Day, and is at the top of my list. If you like this one, the author already has a second book out, with a third to follow later this year.   

 

 

 

The Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

 

This Young Adult novel is the first in a series that is sure to be a massive hit. According to Seira Wilson with the Amazon Book Review:  Tomi Adeyemi’s debut novel is the start of what promises to be an epic, addictive new series. The Children of Blood and Bone is influenced by Adeyemi’s West African heritage, and in it she bends religious deities (the Orïsha) and a diverse landscape into a refreshing new take on fantasy. The Children of Blood and Bone is told from multiple points of view, as Inan and Amari, children of the iron-fisted king, and Zélie and Tzain, siblings who have suffered greatly under the king’s regime, find themselves on a dark, magic-filled quest for power. Their journey is accompanied by violence and betrayal, but friendship and even star-crossed love also play a part. Enriched with themes that resonate in today’s social and political landscape, The Children of Blood and Bone takes on injustice, discrimination, and a struggle for change. The action and danger ramp up with each chapter, and I found myself racing through the final pages, holding my breath right up to the cliffhanger ending.” According to a friend of mine, “Read it already.”

 

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

 

Now a movie starring Amandla Stenburg, The Hate U Give follows Starr Carter after she witnesses the killing of a friend by a white police officer. A fiction account of events that are far too real for many, this book is a timely and necessary read. Several friends of mine found the movie intense and moving, another found the book “heart wrenching and powerful”. The holds line on both the movie and book are long, so if you hope to read or watch it in February, you’d better reserve it through the consortium now. I’m on hold for the audiobook through the Ohio Digital Library.     

 

 

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

 

A couple of years ago, I was taking an exam in my Human Rights and the Judicial Process class… All was silent except the scrawl of pencils on paper, the ticking of the clock, and the tutting and gasping of my professor as he read this book while we tried to answer essay questions. While it was highly distracting, he can be forgiven –  by all accounts The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is the kind of book that elicits reaction. Both he, a retired human rights lawyer, and my mother, a nurse practitioner, feel it is a book that should be read by everyone in their respective professions. It is the most highly recommended book on my list and it is available at the library, so you should come pick it up before I do!

 

Here are some really good articles to further assist you in picking out just the right book!  

 

http://mentalfloss.com/article/532058/books-by-african-american-writers-you-need-to-read

 

www.blackenterprise.com/must-read-books-black-authors-2019/

 

http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/10-black-authors-to-read/#.XEh-l1xKjcs

 

These New and Upcoming Books by Black Authors Will Give You Life …

 

46 Books By Women of Color to Read in 2018 – Electric Literature

Live Stream of Lessons and Carols

Chatfield College presented Lessons and Carols on Friday, December 7, 2018 at 7 p.m. in the Sacred Heart Chapel, with a reception following in the Welcome Center on the St. Martin Campus in Brown County.
Lessons and Carols remind us of the meaning of the Advent Season through music and selected readings by the students and members of the Chatfield College community. The story of the promise of the Messiah and the birth of Jesus are told in 5 short readings taken from the Book of Isaiah and the Gospels, interspersed with the singing of Christmas carols.
The biblical excerpts were read by Chatfield’s speech class. Student readers included Hunter Ellis, Jade West, Cole Brown, Gracie Rhodes, and Lillyan West.
The newly formed drama club showcased a special presentation entitled “T’was the Fight Before Christmas”. Members of the club are Courtney Sedgwick, Miranda Seward, Rae Luti, Londyn Howlett, and Hunter Ellis.
Musicians were John Penrose (guitar), Stephen Culp (drums), Bryan Groomms (bass), and Beth Myers (vocalist).

Alumni Profile- Beth Myers

Who says you can’t go home? Coming back to Chatfield as a staff member after graduating a few years prior felt like coming home to Beth Myers. Working as an admissions counselor at the Brown County campus, Beth has a unique perspective to share with students—because she’s been in their shoes.

Beth first attended Chatfield College as a College Credit Plus (CCP) student when she was a junior at Lynchburg High School. While given many choices to attend college for free while in high school courtesy of the CCP program, Beth knew she would choose Chatfield. She had also heard from a friend that Chatfield credits transferred easily to four-year colleges, and since Beth planned to continue her education, this was important to her. Aside from this, Beth had another reason for picking Chatfield.

“I had aunts, cousins, even sisters who had gone to Chatfield and loved it,” Beth said. “It’s kind of our family college.”

As a student at Chatfield, Beth excelled in her classes. She was inducted in both the Julia Chatfield Honor Society, an honors organization exclusive to Chatfield, and the national Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. She even credits an English course at Chatfield that helped shape her future career plans of becoming a professor in the Communications field. In fact, one of her instructors also encouraged her to investigate Berea College for her four-year degree, because of its unique, tuition-free appeal and superb academics. Having already earned free college credit, and because financing college was important to Beth, she decided she would attend Berea after graduation. Just a week before graduating from her high school, Beth walked across the stage of Chatfield College’s graduation.

Looking forward to earning her bachelor’s degree, Beth said that the rigorous academic work at Chatfield prepared her to move on, and her writing alone was a step above her peers when she arrived at Berea. Unlike most students who had just graduated from high school, Beth already knew how life in college worked. She had mastered time management skills, the drive to complete her tasks on time, and knew how to make her own schedule.  At Berea, Beth worked as a residential advisor and helped plan events at her dorm. Performing as a top student once again, she was also inducted into the Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society for Communication majors.

Graduating from Berea in 2018 with her Bachelor of Arts degree, Beth moved back home and worked a summer internship at American Modern Insurance. She knew she wanted to do something in education but wasn’t quite sure what that might be. Soon after, Beth stumbled upon a job opening in the admissions department at Chatfield College and immediately knew that was the position for her.

“I always knew I wanted to come back to Chatfield. I planned to come back to teach but starting in this position seemed like the perfect place to begin,” Beth said.

Beth was hired just three years after being a student herself.  Beth says that Chatfield still has the community feel she loved as a student, but she’s just on the other side of the coin. As a student, she always felt supported and encouraged, but she never realized everything that goes on behind the scenes in order to provide that support. Aside from her admissions job, Beth has also helped start a drama club for the students, because she knows how important it is to have other extra-curricular activities on campus to really help enrich the experience.

“I love walking out of my office and seeing students hanging out in the Welcome Center, because I can still see myself there. I feel like having been a student just like them, I have a unique position to really help guide the students and understand their needs, “Beth shares.

Looking back on her experience now, Beth is thankful for her experience as a CCP student at Chatfield.  This start eventually led her to Berea, and ultimately brought her back to Chatfield.

“I value the impact Chatfield made on my life and education, and it makes me excited to be in a position to help other students pursue their dreams, too.”

Retirement Plans Provide Both Risk and Opportunity

According to the American Benefits Council, nearly 100 million Americans participate in “qualified”, pre-tax retirement plans, such as IRAs, 401(k)s, SEPs, SIMPLEs, or if you have worked in a non-profit environment, 403(b)s.  If you are one of them, and are age 70 ½ or older, or know someone who is both, you will want to keep reading.  Your retirement plan comes with a serious tax risk for you, but also presents a wonderful opportunity.

You may have heard about the “required minimum distribution” or “RMD”.  That is the amount you are required to withdraw from your qualified retirement account each year beginning with the year you reach the age of 70½.   You can take this amount in a lump sum, or in distributions at least annually based upon your life expectancy.  My mom takes hers monthly to help her with her budgeting.   But some people, hoping to keep their retirement money invested as long as possible, forget to take this distribution.  The consequences can be severe – a possible tax penalty of up to 50% of the amount of the distribution you should have taken.  Ouch!

If you are someone who is 70½ with a retirement account, you can avoid paying any taxes on your RMD by donating the RMD to a worthy charity – like Chatfield College.   You will need to arrange to have your RMD transferred directly from your IRA (or inactive SEP or inactive SIMPLE) to Chatfield.  (Although you cannot make these distributions from your 401(k) plan or other qualified plans, you can roll over your plan balance to an IRA, and then make the transfer of your RMD from your IRA).

This way, none of the RMD is taxable income.  Your donation will not affect your Social Security taxes or Medicare premiums.   This is an especially attractive tool for people who have regularly given to charity in past years, but now with 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in effect, will no longer be able to receive a tax deduction for those December donations.  The new tax law has increased the standard deduction, so many more taxpayers this year will not be itemizing deductions, like charitable contributions.

If you think you might be in this situation, and would like to learn more about your options, you should contact your accountant, attorney or tax advisor. (Chatfield College does not offer tax or legal advice or counsel, and this blog is not intended to do so.)

And if you would like to make a direct donation from your IRA to Chatfield College, please know your gift is very much appreciated, and will be used judiciously in the best interest of our students.

As always, thank you for your loyal support of Chatfield College.

-John P. Tafaro, president

Why Online?

Good question! Colleges and universities all over the country are working to create better and more meaningful online learning opportunities for their students. Chatfield began offering online classes this past January and they have become very popular! The rationale behind offering Chatfield classes online is simple: online courses empower students by eliminating the problems associated with rigid class times and transportation to and from school. Colleges across the country recognize that students are choosing their school for many reasons, including the support they receive given their other responsibilities. Life profiles of today’s students everywhere, including Chatfield, show that many have jobs, families and other circumstances that make attending face-to-face classes on a campus difficult. Students desire more flexibility and accessibility to reach their educational goals. At Chatfield, we want to meet the needs of our students. Online course offerings will allow us to be sensitive to those needs and allow students to receive personalized access to learning at any time and from anywhere.

Caitlin Tucker, an expert and advocate of blended and online learning, identifies that future employers want to hire students who can communicate effectively, think critically, work collaboratively and leverage technology successfully. At Chatfield, we are committed to putting students at the center of their learning and helping them develop these 21st-century skills that are critical to future success. By creating online learning opportunities at Chatfield, we give our students flexible solutions to help them meet their goals and achieve a better future.

Done well, online education can provide a personalized learning culture that encourages student choice in the learning process. Students can expect that the online courses offered at Chatfield will be intentionally designed with the same support and interaction with instructors that they experience in their traditional face-to-face classes at either campus. Students will be challenged online to work in collaboration with other students and the instructor to deepen their understanding and application of course concepts and to meet learning objectives.

If interested in taking an online course this spring, check out what’s being offered. To register, contact your academic advisor or your site director.

The Value of an Internship

Why should you consider hiring an intern? Interns can be beneficial to the employer because it is an extra set of hands for the summer, which can be an extremely busy time for a lot of businesses. Maybe you have been looking for an employee to fill in for someone while they are gone, but do not want to hire a full-time employee? An intern is a great way to fill any open positions that need filled for a short period of time – it not only helps you, but it is also giving them the chance to gain some real working experience. Interns are great to have around because they can also add a lot of spark to your business – they have young, fresh minds and that might just be what you have been looking for!

Why are internships important for college students? Internships are great for college students to get a glimpse into what their future might look like and it provides them with the experience that they need for future employment opportunities. Having an internship during your time as a college student can help you decide if it’s the right career path for you, all while gaining work experience for your resume. Internships can also open doors for you – you meet a lot of people during your time spent at your internship and can provide opportunities for networking with other employers and businesses. The company who hired you on as an intern might even ask you to come back after you graduate if they think you are a good fit!

Whether you are a student thinking about finding an internship, or an employer who is debating hiring an intern for the summer, I think it is important that you know why internships are valuable experiences. As a current intern at Chatfield College, I have learned so much in the four months that I have been here, and I think sharing my experience could be helpful for those who are considering internships.

I have always had some sort of job while in high school and in college. It has always been a priority for me to uphold a job while I am in school so I can start saving money for my college loans. I have always worked part-time throughout the school year and sometimes as a full-time employee during the summer. Although this was good experience for me and could be added to my resume, I wanted to gain more experience in my chosen field. Working as a sales associate was not going to help my graphic design career as much as I had hoped. I decided to look for internships during my junior year of college in hopes to gain more graphic design and marketing experience.

I began an internship at Chatfield College where I essentially took over for a well-experienced employee who had been working there for years. I was hired on to take her place while she was on maternity leave to cover the marketing and digital operations for the school. Chatfield hired me on as a Marketing and Social Media Intern, where I took on the challenge of handling the entire marketing department. I had enough experience in marketing and social media that I was able to meet the needs that they were looking for as their new intern for the summer. After three weeks of training, I was on my own.

I was able to navigate my way through the job fairly well with the help of a few coworkers. Everyone I worked with was super nice and helpful in my first few weeks alone on the job. They all knew I needed a little extra help and were able to push me in the right direction whenever I needed something. After a few weeks on my own, I had already learned so much. I now knew how to write press releases, keep up with weekly social media posts, update the website, and so much more. I was also able to have a lot of freedom when designing flyers and other marketing materials for the college – this was a great way for me to gain graphic design experience because I designed so many different things.

During my time at Chatfield, I have gained so much experience in a lot of different fields like marketing, graphic design, public relations, communications, and digital operations.  I was so worried when I first started because I did not think a college student would be able to keep up with a full-time job that required a lot of experience. It ended up being a great opportunity for me in so many different ways. I was able to gain work experience which will be great to add to my resume and I was able to learn a lot of different skills. I have also been able to connect with other companies and businesses along the way, which will serve as a great way to network in the future.

I think that Chatfield has also benefitted from hiring an intern. I was able to fill a position for a few months while an important employee was at home with her new baby and take care of the marketing department. I met the needs of my employer and provided fresh, new designs and marketing materials. My employer had an immediate need to fill this position for the summer and provide a smooth and effortless transition between the Marketing Director and me. Now, when the Marketing Director returns from maternity leave, it will be like she never left – all of the daily and weekly tasks have been taken care of and are up-to-date. Without an intern, these tasks could have been easily overlooked. Chatfield was able to provide me with great experience and I feel very confident in my ability to find a job after I graduate from college after this internship. In the long run, this internship was able to help not only me, but my employer as well.

Although my internship was not the average experience of an intern, I still think internships are very important. Not every internship requires taking on so many responsibilities and tasks, but they still give you a lot of work experience. Even if the internship is to shadow someone, it is still providing an opportunity to learn about the business or field of work that you are pursuing. My experience helped me decide that my career path is on the right track and that I do want to continue a career in graphic design and marketing. This internship provided me with an opportunity to test it out before making a commitment to my future career, which can be difficult as a college student to decide what to do with the rest of your life!

Internships provide great opportunities for both college students and employers because it helps both of them out in different ways. For the employer, it is a way to fill an immediate position or lend an extra set of hands without the hassle of finding an employee who is only needed for a short period of time. It can also be a way to introduce fresh ideas to the company and get a new perspective in your marketing efforts. For a student, it provides great opportunities to learn and succeed in a real work environment, all while helping them see if this is the right career path for them. Internships are a great way to lend an extra hand and learn so much along the way!

-Taylor Wilson, Social Media and Marketing Intern for Chatfield College